U.S. stocks are mostly higher Monday morning after Congress agreed to a deal that will keep the government operating for the rest of the fiscal year, averting a shutdown that could have affected many businesses that work with the government. Technology companies climbing while energy companies slip with the price of oil.

NEW YORK U.S. stocks are mostly higher Monday morning after Congress agreed to a deal that will keep the government operating for the rest of the fiscal year, averting a shutdown that could have affected many businesses that work with the government. Technology companies climbing while energy companies slip with the price of oil.

KEEPING SCORE: The Standard & Poor's 500 index picked up 3 points, or 0.1 percent, to 2,387 as of 10:05 a.m. Eastern time. The Dow Jones industrial average lost 8 points to 20,932. The Nasdaq composite rose 21 points, or 0.4 percent, to 6,068. That put the index on track for another record close. The Russell 2000 index of small-company stocks dipped 1 point, or 0.1 percent, to 1,399.

EARLY LEADERS: Technology companies did better than the rest of the market. Apple climbed $2.18, or 1.5 percent, to $145.83 and Facebook added $1.53, or 1 percent, to $151.78. Apple will report its first-quarter results after the market closes on Tuesday and Facebook will make its report late Wednesday. Consumer-focused companies also rose, as online retailer Amazon.com picked up $15.60, or 1.7 percent, to $940.59, and health care companies traded higher.

TRIBUNE TALKS? Tribune Media rose after the Financial Times reported that 21st Century Fox and Blackstone may make a joint takeover bid for the company. Tribune Media has stakes in Food Network, WGN cable network and owns TV stations. Tribune stock gained $221, or 6 percent, to $38.77. The companies declined to comment. Sinclair Broadcast Group is also reported to be interested in buying Tribune.