After a week of discussion, the LSU vs. Florida football game that was originally scheduled for Oct. 8, in Gainesville, has now been moved to Nov. 19, in Baton Rouge.

As you can imagine, Gator fans are not happy. But before they choose to unleash their anger upon LSU, they might want to look to their leadership first.

After a week of discussion, the LSU vs. Florida football game that was originally scheduled for Oct. 8, in Gainesville, has now been moved to Nov. 19, in Baton Rouge.

As you can imagine, Gator fans are not happy. But before they choose to unleash their anger upon LSU, they might want to look to their leadership first.

They are not in this position because of the Tigers. They are in this position solely as a result of the total incompetence of their own administration—most notably, Athletic Director Jeremy Foley.

Foley had the audacity to have a press conference soon after the announcement was made and take shots at LSU.

He said, “We made the decision to play the game in Baton Rouge. The conference office asked us to find a solution in working with LSU, yet LSU was never a true partner in our discussions. The Southeastern Conference offered some other solutions, and the LSU administration made it clear that they were unwilling to consider other reasonable options.”

Cool story, bro.

I think it’s time Florida’s AD channel his inner Matt Foley and hang out in a van down by a river of his own tears. He made this bed. Now, he and his school have to lie in it.

His job performance the week before was shameful and embarrassing.

Anyone and everyone could see as far back as Monday that Hurricane Matthew would be making landfall in Florida and that Gainesville was most likely going to be affected.

Despite the obvious, Foley and Florida had no contingency plan. They simply sat on their hands for four days without a clue.

Come Tuesday, it was clear Matthew was coming. Come Wednesday, we all knew Matthew was imminent.

They were supposed to make a decision on the game by that evening, but they delayed it until Thursday morning.

Thursday morning came, and they delayed the decision until noon. Noon came, and they delayed the decision until later.

Finally, at 3 p.m. (Eastern) on Thursday, they decided to postpone the game, despite the teams not sharing a common date for their bye—which would increase the difficulty level of rescheduling the contest.

This decision was a complete head-scratcher and became even more laughable when Saturday came.

While LSU and Florida players sat at home, Gainesville was sunny and clear.

Meanwhile, North Carolina and North Carolina State were hosting games in monsoons. Both South Florida and Miami hosted games as scheduled. South Carolina played on Sunday.

LSU wanted to play. They offered every option available, but Foley and Florida turned down every single scenario.

LSU offered to play at a neutral site. That was rejected.

LSU offered to fly the Gators to Baton Rouge and play in Tiger Stadium. That was rejected.

The Tigers offered to play in Gainesville on Sunday and even as late as Monday. Both options were rejected.

Heck, LSU even offered to play the game in an empty stadium. Once again, Foley and Florida rejected this proposal.

SEC Commissioner Greg Sankey isn’t innocent in all of this either. Instead of being assertive and taking charge, he decided to occupy a front-row seat and watch the negotiations haplessly fall apart.

It’s funny. Foley spoke so highly about player and fan safety when explaining why he turned down all of the options LSU offered. Yet, safety wasn’t on his radar when he was still saying Wednesday evening that they would be playing on Saturday, despite the hurricane being projected to hit Gainesville.

But now, all of a sudden, LSU is the bad guy?

I commend LSU Athletic Director Joe Alleva for drawing that line in the sand last week and saying that they would not be cancelling their home game with South Alabama and traveling to Florida on Nov. 19.

This would have set up a stretch of three straight SEC road games in the span of 12 days.

Also, the school would have lost close to $5 million, and the already struggling Baton Rouge economy would have lost over $10 million in revenue without the home matchup.

Yes, Florida is getting a raw deal having to play a home game in Baton Rouge, but once again, it didn’t have to be that way. They have no one to blame but themselves.

It happens.

Last year, South Carolina had to play a home game in Baton Rouge due to the aftermath of Hurricane Joaquin. They made that decision on Wednesday. Take notes, Gators.

In the aftermath of Katrina, LSU had to play a home game against Arizona State in Tempe, Ariz., back in 2005. So, we know what it’s like to be on the other side.

Maybe next time something like this happens, Foley and Florida won’t drag their feet and wait until the last minute to make a decision.

You know what they say: he who hesitates is lost. In this case, for those that hesitate, a home game is lost.