Seven questions that have me worried are the following: 1. What is the future of residents, homeowners, renters, small businesses, farmers, hunters, fishermen, and the food industry in Lousisiana? 2. What is the future of fresh drinking water in Louisiana? 3. Do the industrial complexes and pipeline companies have any emergency plan that will protect us from having another BP oil spill type of crisis or water pollution crisis similar to Houston's past flood crisis? 4. How much funding and aid will be available for us in Louisiana? 5. How will the next big storm impact us? 6. What will Louisiana do about climate change? 7. And how much will flooding increase coastal erosion in Louisiana?

TheGuardian.com reported that a Dutch judge ruled that the government should take action on climate change by cutting greenhouse gas emissions by 25 percent within five years. A teen activist stated years ago at the UN that some world governments are taking away our human rights, the right to live.

Today, Palestine and Israeli teens strike together to take on the world's climate change crisis. Following massive reports and stories of flooding across the United States (mainly the Midwest, which is nicknamed the heart, the "Bread Basket" of the U.S.), concerns grow on flooding and climate change.

From heavy rainfalls in Iowa to heavy snow in Wyoming, I wondered why the U.S. hasn't declared a national emergency crisis. Many people across the country share concerns about agriculture, business, and other issues threatened by this flooding crisis.

Many worry if funding will be available to help the citizens of this country. I think this should be number one priority right now in the United States and especially locally in South Louisiana as the South Louisiana landscape has the potential to change forever and impact about half of Louisiana's population of 4,600,000 people, according to the currently updated U.S. Census.

Moreover, around Louisiana, Fox8Live.com reported that some scientists found out that the opening of the Bonnet Carre Spillway contributed to nearly 100 dolphins deaths in the Mississippi Sound just in this first half of the year.

WBRZ News reported that DOTD deployed 100-foot sands sacks and aqua dams in efforts to minimize flooding in St. Martin Parish and Assumption Parish. Also reported, high levels of the Mississippi River and Atchafalaya River are among flooding because smaller tributaries have no where to drain.

WAFB reports that the Mississippi River broke its record of days at or above flood stages at 136 consecutive days.The Morganza Spillway will open again while endangering wildlife in the area of the Morganza Spillway. Fishermen and hunters are concerned of having old, heavily polluted water pushed into fishing areas and killing everything.

Many small businesses and landowners expressed their concerns to multiple news outlets across South Louisiana. Many people are worried and make references to The Great Flood of 2016, the two 2005 storms (Katrina and Rita), and The Great Flood of 1927.

Many people are either sharing stories online or just talking with their neighbors.

In Ascension Parish, WVLA NBC Local 33 reported flooding issues in Ascension Parish, which caused road closures in some areas. Some Ascension Parish residents have concerns on if the Army Corps of Engineers have performed a proper, complete study of the impact of the Ridge Levee extension project and its affect on different communities.

The Advocate reported that a Livingston official, in resentment, called the Ascension Parish Levee projects "morally" wrong. The Advocate also noted that some citizens feel the levee district and Ascension Parish officials may have downplayed flood concerns.

Climate change is real and I think it is sad that many people either deny climate change being a reality or just want to remain blind to climate change issues in regards to greed, gluttony, loftiness, hatred, etc.

Seven questions that have me worried are the following: 1. What is the future of residents, homeowners, renters, small businesses, farmers, hunters, fishermen, and the food industry in Lousisiana? 2. What is the future of fresh drinking water in Louisiana?

3. Do the industrial complexes and pipeline companies have any emergency plan that will protect us from having another BP oil spill type of crisis or water pollution crisis similar to Houston's past flood crisis? 4. How much funding and aid will be available for us in Louisiana?

5. How will the next big storm impact us? 6. What will Louisiana do about climate change? 7. And how much will flooding increase coastal erosion in Louisiana?

I remember that the first commandment that the Lord gave to Adam in the Book of Genesis was to tend to His garden. The Lord made this Earth for us to keep up and enjoy under God's Law.

Furthermore, the Book of Revelation warns mankind of the dangers and punishment of defiance. I pray that our future will be turned around before this world faces a doomsday in the near future. Even though the Lord promised us He will not destroy Earth by water again, it does not omit the fiery destruction of the Earth or the fiery destruction of our souls.

We must act now to protect our future. Water is life.